Serial, Super Serial: Quantum of Solace

on March 05, 2012

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Super Serial aims to dissect series of pop art — be it a filmography, discography or run of comics — by looking at its individual components

It’s been a long, hard journey. We’ve been from Russia with love, to the Swiss Alps, and even to outer space. Through 22 (+1) films, I can’t say I’m a diehard fan — hell, I can’t even say I liked most of these films — but it was important for me to fill this gaping hole in my cinema experience. If anything, seeing all of these films over a few months span has allowed me to closely identify the running themes, similarities and differences between them. I’ll never forget some of the Bond Girls, villains, gadgets and songs (for better or for worse). Now that I’ve seen these films, there is no doubt in my mind that they are truly “iconic.” And even when they’ve been bad, they’ve still been fun. — more

Tagged: james bond, marc foster, quantum of solace, super serial
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Serial, Super Serial: Casino Royale

on March 05, 2012

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Super Serial aims to dissect series of pop art — be it a filmography, discography or run of comics — by looking at its individual components

I didn’t feel too bad about never seeing The Man with the Golden Gun or For Your Eyes Only, but you can have legitimate beef with me for never seeing Casino Royale. I have no good excuse other than holding out on Bond films because I hadn’t seen any of them. For that, I apologize.

I’m not yet sure if I think Casino Royale is the “best” Bond film, but it has a definitive case. — more

Tagged: casino royale, james bond, martin campbell, super serial
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Serial, Super Serial: Die Another Day

on March 03, 2012

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Super Serial aims to dissect series of pop art — be it a filmography, discography or run of comics — by looking at its individual components.

Die Another Day (Bond #20) is a Bond film of these times — mostly because it has an obvious ADD problem. There are too many characters, too many twists and WAY too much CGI. — more

Tagged: die another day, james bond, lee tamahori, super serial
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Serial, Super Serial: The World is Not Enough

on March 03, 2012

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Super Serial aims to dissect series of pop art — be it a filmography, discography or run of comics — by looking at its individual components.

Denise Richards is a nuclear physicist. That, in a nutshell, is The World Is Not Enough. — more

Tagged: james bond, michael apted, super serial, the world is not enough
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Serial, Super Serial: Tomorrow Never Dies

on February 15, 2012

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Super Serial aims to dissect series of pop art — be it a filmography, discography or run of comics — by looking at its individual components.

In my review of Octopussy, I noted that a James Bond film cannot be satisfying without compelling villains and Bond Girls — that even a pretty good mission plot will stall without these notable characteristics. Tomorrow Never Dies, the eighteenth official film of the series, isn’t exactly the opposite of that, but even with memorable characters, the film leaves me a little cold. — more

Tagged: james bond, roger spottiswoode, super serial, tomorrow never dies
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Serial, Super Serial: GoldenEye

on February 07, 2012

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Super Serial aims to dissect series of pop art — be it a filmography, discography or run of comics — by looking at its individual components.

Perhaps best known for the N64 game that single-handedly lead to massive multi-shooter parties in dorm rooms across the country, Martin Campbell’s 1995 GoldenEye is the seventeenth official James Bond release, and a reboot of sorts. Coming a full six years after its predecessor, the film is certainly a fresh start, with a recasting of major characters and its taking place in a world with a much different geopolitical landscape. Still, it borders the tone the Dalton films set — with less emphasis on humor and more on balls-to-the-wall action. — more

Tagged: goldeneye, james bond, martin campbell, super serial
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Chronicle

on February 07, 2012

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Over the past few years, there have been three subgenres and film styles that have been becoming increasingly popular: the fake-doc found footage film, the origin story and the super-hero existing in the real world film. Josh Trank’s Chronicle attempts to meld all three of these film subgenres together, and, for the most part, the individual pieces of this equation are as satisfactory as we’ve seen. — more

Tagged: chronicle, josh trank
Found in Movie Reviews

The Marx Brothers Encyclopedia

The Marx Bros

on February 03, 2012

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If you want to know absolutely everything there is to know about the renowned comedy team the Marx Brothers, don’t waste your time anywhere other than Glenn Mitchell’s revised and expanded new edition of “The Marx Brothers Encyclopedia.” — more

Tagged: glen mitchell, marx bros, marx bros encyclopedia
Found in Book Reviews, Movie Nothings

Serial, Super Serial: License to Kill

on February 03, 2012

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Super Serial aims to dissect series of pop art — be it a filmography, discography or run of comics — by looking at its individual components.

Bond’s filmmakers must have decided they liked the direction of The Living Daylights, because they ran with it for License to Kill. Cut out most of the humor and a lot of normal James Bond formula and this is what you’re left with. — more

Tagged: james bond, john glen, license to kill, super serial
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Serial, Super Serial: The Living Daylights

on January 23, 2012

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Super Serial aims to dissect series of pop art — be it a filmography, discography or run of comics — by looking at its individual components.

Although we’ve seen four James Bond films made in the 1980s (three official), The Living Daylights is the first that feels like an “80s movie.” Although all of the Bond films have been financially and culturally successful, with new action hits like The Terminator, First Blood, Predator and Die Hard made in during the decade, we can see a major trend of machismo and explosions (which has never really gone away). It was only a matter of time before the Bond franchise would follow, and John Glen’s 1987 The Living Daylights delivers as a more serious action film in that style. Changing the star of the film certainly helps this shift in tone, and first-time Bond Timothy Dalton more exemplifies the action star than any of the previous actors. — more

Tagged: james bond, john glen, super serial, the living daylights
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