Grisly’s Top 10 Films of 2011

best-of-ten

on January 12, 2012

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As you’ve probably noticed, 2011 was a pretty good year for film. While I was one of the few saying the hate for 2010 was a little exaggerated, there is no doubt that this year’s crop of films really delivered. — more

Tagged: 13 assassins, attack the block, incendies, martha marcy may marlene, meek's cutoff, melancholia, pariah, take shelter, the interrupter, warrior
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Serial, Super Serial: A View to a Kill

on January 09, 2012

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Super Serial aims to dissect series of pop art — be it a filmography, discography or run of comics — by looking at its individual components.

After our short but unofficial break with last week’s Never Say Never Again, Roger Moore returns as James Bond in John Glen’s 1985 A View to a Kill, the fourteenth of the series and last for its star. Taking place near the beginning of the rise of the personal computer, the film uses this real-world fascination at the center of its plot. Bond films have often taken the fears of the Cold War or have aped the styles of popular genres, so the film’s interest in the microchip is an interesting look at technology of the 1980s. — more

Tagged: a view to a kill, james bond, john glen, super serial
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Serial, Super Serial: Never Say Never Again

on January 04, 2012

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Super Serial aims to dissect series of pop art — be it a filmography, discography or run of comics — by looking at its individual components.

All of the films I’ve previously talked about have been produced by Eon Productions, and mostly produced by the team of Albert Broccoli and Harry Saltzman. In fact, all James Bond films minus two were produced by Eon — the 1967 spy spoof Casino Royale and Never Say Never Again. Directed by Irvin Kershner, best known for The Empires Strike Back (Episode V for those under 20), and despite a solid cast, it doesn’t quite live up to the talent involved. — more

Tagged: irvin kershner, james bond, never say never again, super serial
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Best of 2011 – Genre Films

midnight-1

on January 04, 2012

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Looking for something to Netflix? Look no further, Grisly Gunnar picks his top 5 movies of 2011 from each genre. — more

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The Hammer Vault

hammer1

on December 21, 2011

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“This book does not aim to provide a complete history of Hammer, but to share the best with its archive on a film-by-film basis. The classics are presented alongside a judicious selection of other titles, each dated to the year production began. The journey begins in 1954 with the experiment that transformed both Hammer and of course British cinema.” — more

Tagged: hammer films, the wicker man
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Serial, Super Serial: Octopussy

on December 20, 2011

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Super Serial aims to dissect series of pop art — be it a filmography, discography or run of comics — by looking at its individual components.

Octopussy proves that a decent film with some major strengths cannot be a good Bond film without compelling villains and Bond Girls. Even though the film has one of the more exciting climaxes seen in a Bond mission, overall it feels bland. — more

Tagged: james bond, john glen, octopussy, super serial
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Serial, Super Serial: For Your Eyes Only

on December 13, 2011

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Super Serial aims to dissect series of pop art — be it a filmography, discography or run of comics — by looking at its individual components.

Welcome to the ‘80s! The third decade of the Bond series begins with For Your Eyes Only, the directorial debut of previous editor and second unit shooter John Glen. Although I wouldn’t lavish too much credit on Glen, I appreciate this film more than many others in the series. It has some painfully comedic side-steps, but, along with On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, this has the most serious, realistic tone of any of the films. I don’t want to downplay that there are some major comedic misses here (see the “Random Thoughts” for examples), and this inconsistent tone may turn some viewers off, but I applaud For Your Eyes Only for striving for something with a little more resonance. It may not totally succeed, but an attempt is something. — more

Tagged: for your eyes only, james bond, john glen, super serial
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Serial, Super Serial: Moonraker

on December 06, 2011

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Super Serial aims to dissect series of pop art — be it a filmography, discography or run of comics — by looking at its individual components.

I don’t know who writes the Netflix plot summaries for movies, but please sign me up. The entries for James Bond films have been particularly amazing. I don’t think I can do much better than them setting up Moonraker: “Agent 007 (Roger Moore) blasts into orbit in this action-packed adventure that takes him to Venice, Rio de Janeiro … and outer space.” — more

Tagged: james bond, lewis gilbert, moonraker, super serial
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Serial, Super Serial: The Spy Who Loved Me

on November 28, 2011

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Super Serial aims to dissect series of pop art — be it a filmography, discography or run of comics — by looking at its individual components.

Ten years after his first Bond film, Lewis Gilbert returns to direct 1977′s The Spy Who Loved Me. His previous film, You Only Live Twice, is perhaps my least favorite of the films so far, and he improves greatly with his second try. I wouldn’t yet call Gilbert an auteur, but you can see lines connecting his two films, even though they are separated by ten years and four Bond films. — more

Tagged: james bond, lewis gilbert, super serial, the spy who loved me
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Serial, Super Serial: The Man with the Golden Gun

on November 25, 2011

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Super Serial aims to dissect series of pop art — be it a filmography, discography or run of comics — by looking at its individual components.

Guy Hamilton’s 1974 The Man with the Golden Gun is an unremarkable yet enjoyable film where it feels like every Bond cliche finally clicks into place. From the film’s sequence of scenes to its villain and Bond Girls, this is the first film that has really felt explicitly formula to me. That, of course, is mildly frustrating, but you can tell that the screenwriters, director and actors all know the game they’re in and play it full tilt. Basically, if this post seems incredibly generic, don’t blame me, blame the film. — more

Tagged: guy hamilton, james bond, super serial, the man with the golden gun
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