Fear Itself #1

Fear Itself #1

B-

It’s finally here… time to brush aside all the hype, put away the endless promos, peel back the tape on your mylar comic bag and just read the issue. The latest “event” crossover from our friends at Marvel has officially kicked off with Matt Fraction sitting behind the typewriter and Stuart Immonen hunched over the drawing board. I was pretty excited to see Immonen get a crack at such a high-profile series as this, his recent work on New Avengers had wowed me pretty consistently and here he delivers one of the prettiest comic books you’ll see all year.

As pretty as this issue looks, I just never felt that it delivered story wise. Oddly enough though, I still feel like this will definitely be a series to watch. What’s odd is, for as large of an issue as this is—it’s certainly pretty hefty—it sure took a long time to build to the story’s first climax, and even that didn’t feel very gripping. Yes, the series is called Fear Itself and Matt Fraction is attempting to tie this series into the current status quo gripping our country, what with all of the unemployment, anger and Glenn Becks out there, but the brief riot scene the series opens with seemed somewhat ham-fisted to me. Fraction attempts to drive the theme home even further by introducing us to resident’s of Broxton Oklahoma—current home of the Norse gods—as they’re evicted from their foreclosed home and expressing anger of Tony Stark’s plan to put people to work by building a new city of Asgard. Why not build homes for the lowly mortals who need them? Surly the gods can take care of themselves…

Which is exactly what Odin seems to believe as we get not one, but two showdowns with Thor over this very subject, ending with Thor unable to lift his mighty hammer and then knocked unconscious. The Norse gods are choosing to abandon Earth, and in the meantime Sin, the daughter of the Red Skull and coincidentally, the current Red Skull, is traveling around digging up her father’s hidden mystical artifacts collection for what is surly going to be no good. Which is where the story really lost me, I know it’s only the first issue, but I really expected to have a clearer understanding of what the threat actually is. For such a large issue they certainly could’ve made this more clear? Maybe one Thor/Odin showdown would’ve been enough?

But still, I’m intrigued by the story and think it may have some potential… plus I’m more than willing to keep coming back for the artwork of Stuart Immonen. Especially if it means we get to see Tony Stark’s ass handed to him for coming up with such a stupid plan…

tags: matt fraction, stuart immonen, thor

  • Anonymous

    I think one of the biggest problems plaguing Marvel’s crossovers in general is a really poor lack of pacing. Ex: the last 5 issues of Secret Invasion are essentially one action, Civil War anti-climaxes in #7 and has its real ending in Cap #25. So while I’m saddened to hear it continues in Fear Itself, I’m not surprised. Gotta milk that story for all it’s worth, I guess.

  • http://twitter.com/astamm78 Andrew Stamm

    I thought Siege and House of M were paced pretty well… you’re right about Secret Invasion being too long though, and Civil War? You’re right about Cap #25, but that installment NEEDED to be in an issue of Captain America, Brubaker had been building to that moment for so long on his run.

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