Green Lantern #1

green-lantern-1-2

B+

First off, when I started this site I didn’t read comics regularly. I wanted to write about movies, music and other nerdy nothings, but hadn’t thought to do much else with the site. But when my good pal Spaceman came aboard to write about comics, it seemed a perfect fit for the site. I asked him for a few of his favorite books to read and I slowly started immersing myself in the comic world. Rikki then came aboard and we really started pushing out reviews. After reading his review of Sweet Tooth #18, I knew it was a book I’d love. But as a completionista, I needed to start with #1 and work my way to #18. After reading up to and through #18, I was in love. What an amazing book, brilliant art and superb storytelling. I didn’t know comic books could be this good. I really had no idea. At that point I was hooked.

I bored you with that little intro to let you know my novice background in the comic arts. So think of that before you send angry hate-mail about how ignorant I am regarding Green Lantern and how my review is ten tons of horseshit stuffed into 500 words. Because, to set the record straight, we’re on the same page.

I don’t know dick about Green Lantern, but Rikki and the other folks have their hands full and isn’t that the point of the reboot, to get nerdlings like me involved in books they haven’t yet read? Also, I haven’t seen the movie.

Preamble out of the way? Check.

Who is this red dood in shackles? OK, he’s a treasonous, lantern-y fella about to be given a second chance by some floating angry smurfs. Cool! I like it so far. Bam, we’re back on earth and Hal Jordan is adjusting to life away from home, really, really far away from home — another galaxy. And you know what that means… BILLS to PAY! And saving the universe doesn’t pay what it used to.

The expository dialogue is pretty grating, even for me. It’s very forced. But I needed it, newcomers need it to know what’s going on, the unfortunate side effect is that the words end up coming out of the character’s mouths in ways that you would never do in real-life. But I get why they’re doing it and it’s acceptable in this context.

The first thing I noticed was how vivid the colors in this book are. They leap from the page. The contrast is amazing. Everything is super sharp and the detail of the action is very easy on the eyes. You don’t have to struggle to make out what the characters are doing, it’s very specific. The line work is super fluid. I really dig the art a lot. The only thing that bugged me was the lack of definition in Carol Ferris’ face. It was like plastic, no shadows, no wrinkles, no texture at all. Next to Hal and the others, she looked downright freakish in some panels.

The story was mostly set-up but I felt properly introduced to the main players. It was an easy read, but in a good way, in a way that felt effortless and fun. I’ll definitely be tuning in to future issues.

Pull list verdict: KEEP IT.

tags: David Baron, doug mahnke, geoff johns, green lantern, the new 52

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  • Anonymous

    I definitely agree with this review. I love Doug Mahnke’s art, and the colors tend to be awesome in the GL books, but I never noticed that about Carol’s face – you’re right. I enjoyed the book too, and I plan to keep reading. 

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