Quick Hits: Reviews of Amazing Spider-Man #641 and more…

Amazinf Spider-Man #641

Amazing Spider-Man #641: And so “One Moment in Time,” comes to a close with this latest issue of Spidey drawn by Paolo Rivera along with Joe Quesada and written by Mr. Quesada as well. So yeah, this issue does, finally, answer the question of how Peter Parker made the entire world—minus one Mary Jane Watson—forget that he unmasked himself as Spider-Man during the “Civil War” storyline. So yeah, the cats out of the bag… and what’s more did it ever really need to be? The particulars of how it happened aren’t really that exciting, nor does this, I imagine, not differ greatly from the expectations of how most readers thought it happened. Some pretty art aside, from Mr. Rivera, not Mr. Quesada, this issue fails to impress. C

Amazing Spider-Man #642: Two issues in one week? Sounds like a scheduling mishap to me! Nonetheless, of the two Amazing Spider-Man issues this week, this one gets my recommendation to read. Fun and fast with some great art—this time from Paul Azaceta—and a whole mess of villains, this is how Spider-Man should be, not the overwrought, ponderous mess that was the “One Moment in Time” arc. A-

Batman #703: Tony Daniel is back on board this month as writer of the monthly Batman series, though, sadly, not handling the artistic duties this month. Kevin Nowlan is at the artboard this month providing some decent art for this one-off issue detailing Dick Grayson and Damian Wayne tailing down a thief that harkens back—or so they think—to the old days of Bruce Wayne’s Batman when he had a young Grayson at his side as Robin. For one-offs this is a very good issue that sheds some light on the character of Damian Wayne, doing a very good job of making that character less two-dimensional than he has been in some past issues. B+

Batman & Robin #14: If you believe writer Grant Morrison’s claim that his entire run on Batman from 2006 on is one massive story arc (and I think you must), it makes looking at any single issue fairly difficult, since its true impactwon’t become clear until the whole thing’s over. Still, I really enjoyed Batman & Robin #14; this issue has a lot of cool moments where you can see Morrison laying down his cards (or knocking over his dominoes, if you prefer), and Frazer Irving’s creepy-ass artwork compliments the mood of this story, especially the scenes with the Joker, very well. One gets the sense that this whole thing is building to something tremendous,but so far just getting there has been a lot of fun. A
Review by Rebel Rikki

Invincible Iron Man #30: Yes, this storyline from Matt Fraction is still limping along. We’re on Part 6 of this arc, and I’m guessing at least two more issues from wrapping up. More Pepper Potts as Rescue, more Tony Stark being Tony, a little more light is shed on Justine and Sasha Hammer and, finally, some stuff blows up. A bit of an improvement over the last issue, nonetheless, I’ll be looking forward to seeing where Fraction takes this series once this story is out of the way. Invincible Iron Man started out with a lot of potential, let’s hope these last few issues are merely a speedbump in the way of more quality issues to come. C

Justice League: Generation Lost #9: I started reading this series because of Keith Giffen’s co-writer credit; I’m not really a fan of Judd Winick and his tendency to give people awful diseases at the drop of a hat. You might imagine my dismay,then, when Giffen left the book completely in Winick’s hands. Yet we’re two issues into Winick’s sole proprietorship and I think it works. Judd’s propensity for heart-on-sleeve drama lends itself well to the cast of this book, because we want to see them constantly bickering. In addition, artist Fernando Dagnino does a bang-up job of capturing some Kevin MacGuire-isms. Combined, these two make Generation Lost really feel like another chapter of Justice League International, which is I think what we all want out of it. A-
Review by Rebel Rikki

New Avengers #4: The last issue from Brian Michael Bendis and Stuart Immomen ended with quite an interesting revelation and this issues follows suit, even upping the ante a bit as well. Stuart Immomen’s art on this series has been so good I almost wish he could draw every comic. The writing is fairly strong as well, not a whole lot of plot, but some fun scenes with this Avengers team fighting demons from another dimension in the middle of Central Park, my only complaint would be the includion of yet another scene of Damian Hellstrom lecturing Stephen Strange and Dr. Voodoo… B+

Transformers: Drift #1: IDW Publishing continues their trend of spotlighting individual Transformers in four-issue minis with Drift, who’s interesting because he’s the first important (i.e. toy-having) Transformers character created in the comics. The artwork here is simply gorgeous; Alex Milne may be the best working artist who makes a living drawing giant robots. Writer Shane McCarthy, who’s knocked it out of the park on projects like All Hail Megatron, doesn’t give us a whole lot to go on in this first issue, although longtime Transformers fans might find themselves tantalized by the antagonists at the issue’s end (Quintessons,anyone?). B
Review by Rebel Rikki

Ultimate Comics Avengers 3 #2/X-Men #3: I’m going to review these two issues together and keep it short by simply saying… ugh, still with the vampires?. C

X-Force Sex & Violence #3: A fun end to a fun—and very violent—series as Craig Kyle and Christopher Yost say goodbye to the X-Force team they brought together just a few years ago. Uncanny X-Force debuts next month with a new team and a new writer and this issue is a fitting send-off for Kyle and Yost as they get the rest of their X-Force into the action as Wolverine and Domino face down not only the Assassins Guild but the Hand as well. More great art from Gabriele Dellotto. A

All reviews by Spaceman Spiff, except where noted.

tags: avengers, batman, guardians of the galaxy, iron man, justice league, quick hits, spider-man, thanos imperative, transformers, x-force, x-men

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