Quick Hits: Reviews of Fear Itself #3, iZombie #14 and more…

Fear Itself #3

Fear Itself #3: Fear Itself had been enjoyable enough so far—nothing to really make me sit up and take notice—and mainly that was due to the artwork of Stuart Immonen, but with issue number three writer Matt Fraction really gets things cooking and makes readers take notice of the potential that this latest event from Marvel really has. Of course going any further into this would involve some major spoilers, but let’s just say the Hulk is on a rampage, Ben Grimm probably shouldn’t have been so grabby and we get former Captain America, Steve Rogers, jumping into the fray while current Captain America, Bucky Barnes, tries to hold the line in Washington D.C. with some help from the Black Widow and the Falcon. I hope issue number four ups the ante as much as this issue did! A-
Review by Spaceman Spiff

Batman Beyond #6: “Industrial Revolution” continues with the revelation of the villain attempting to wrestle the Wayne-Powers Corporation out of Bruce Wayne’s hands. It’s Derek Powers, the villainous Blight,  presumed dead at the end of Batman Beyond season 1. The way this series mixes elements of the Batman/Batman Beyond mythos with a bit of real-world financial maneuvering is fascinating. As much as I don’t really like the art of Ryan Benjamin, his interpretation of the radioactive Blight is chilling. He’s a great villain and one of the early defining elements of Batman Beyond as a canon. I think many fans would be glad writer Adam Beechen has brought him back, and I’m certainly among them.  B+
Review by Rebel Rikki

iZombie #14: Of all the comics I read, I think iZombie is the most soap-opera like. I don’t mean that at all as a slam on the book — writer Chris Roberson is incredibly adapt at juggling a huge and interesting cast of characters. That usually means that plots only advance by small amounts in each installment, but everybody gets their due. So long as the book continues to be compelling, that’s just fine. In this issue Gwen helps her latest victim find peace by winning a skeeball tournament. Meanwhile, Spot’s stuck underground with a bunch of angry zombies and Gwen’s past begins to catch up with her thanks to the scheming of mysterious suitor Amon and the evil Galatea. The Dead Presidents back-up also returns, this time with a hilarious cameo. iZombie‘s a great example of how to mix humor into a really gripping story (especially one with fantastical elements), and the artwork of Mike Allred never disappoints.  A-
Review by Rebel Rikki

Superboy #8: The recent news of DC’s mega-reboot makes it difficult to know how to contextualize their comics. In any other setting, I’d write the events of Superboy #8 off as a tease, but right now it seems that any DC comic playing at finality might need to be taken seriously. Jeff Lemire and Pier Gallo’s latest issue sure feels like it’s building to some massive conclusion, as it begins to tie together plot threads that’ve been brewing since issue #1. Is it the end of an arc or the end of another short-lived Superboy series? Either way, it’s pretty good, although one gets the sense Lemire really wanted to write a fantasy-adventure series; the setting Superboy and friends find themselves in seems more in keeping with classic Vertigo characters like Swamp Thing or John Constantine than a half-Superman/half-Lex Luthor clone child.  B
Review by Rebel Rikki

Sweet Tooth #22: I’m really glad DC decided to brand all their Vertigo books with Green Lantern movie promos — what a way to preserve the integrity of their adult-oriented comics imprint. Shitty business decisions notwithstanding, Vertigo again produces what I’d consider a must-read with Sweet Tooth #22. The “Endangered Species” arc continues as Gus and Jepperd meet Walter, the crippled plague survivor who’s offered his hydroelectric dam as shelter to the rest of Jepperd’s party. Of course, it’s within Jepperd’s nature to be distrustful, and although Walter seems harmless we may be given cause to agree when a rival group of survivors comes into the picture. Lemire’s post-apocalyptic tale never fails to be compelling, and his art perfectly suits the tone of this book. More please.  A-
Review by Rebel Rikki

Uncanny X-Force #11: Let’s face it, with a new storyline that carries the name “The Dark Angel Saga” you know things are going to get good. This first issue of the arc didn’t disappoint either. Logan leads the team into the Age of Apocalypse along with the Dark Beast to track down an object that will help Warren Worthington gain control of the murderous impulses of his Archangel personea. As you can imagine, things quickly go south with betrayel, unexpected appearances and alternate versions of friends and foes showing up to complicate matters. This issue was an absolute joy to read; writer Rick Remender has made the most memorable X-Men related series in some time and artist Mark Brooks is a great addition to this series on art. A
Review by Spaceman Spiff

tags: batman beyond, fear itself, izombie, matt fraction, stuart immonen, superboy, sweet tooth, uncanny x-force

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