Quick Hits: Reviews of Knight & Squire #2 and more…

Knight & Squire #2

Knight & Squire #2: Although it’s an improvement over last issue, this installment of Knight & Squire still doesn’t totally deliver. We do get an actual plot this time, and some nice jokes (I particularly liked the opening few pages) but this series just feels so… inconsequential. We do get a lovely cover from Yanick Paquette, though.  B-
Review by Rebel Rikki

The Amazing Spider-Man #648: This is it. “Big Time” is here. Now a bi-weekly, oversized series with Dan Slott handling all the writing duties this new direction in the Spider-Man world is off to a good start. Slott certainly hits the ground running as Spider-Man leads the Avengers—that’d be the main Avengers team, not the New, Secret or Academy Avengers—into battle against Doctor Octopus’ robots. In much the way “Brand New Day” started the ball rolling by introducing several plot threads that prevailed for many months Slott drops hints at whats to come several times throughout this issue. As for Humberto Ramos’ art… well, I’ve just never been a fan of his overly cartoony style, but in the end it doesn’t distract from the story. A-
Review by Spaceman Spiff

Avengers: The Children’s Crusade #3: This issue was a let-down after the first two, fantastic chapters of this story from Allan Heinberg and Jim Cheung. The last issue ended with a pretty suprising cliffhanger, and here they try to follow suit, but after the enormity of the last suprise the one that we get here seems too logical to really shock. As always Cheung’s art is fantastic, it’s just too bad that he doesn’t have much to do here besides talking heads as Magneto, Quicksilver and the Young Avengers team argue about how to proceed now that Dr. Doom is in the picture. And is it just me or does Heinberg’s characterization of Wolverine just totally miss the mark? I know he’s angry at the Scarlet Witch, but his bloodlust seems kinda dated to his early X-Men days. B-
Review by Spaceman Spiff

Avengers Prime #4: This was a more subdued issue of this mini-series from Bendis and legend penciller Alan Davis. Most of the action takes place between the Enchantress and Hela while our three heroes—Captain America, Iron Man and Thor—regroup and have some nice moments of male bonding. Considering the whole “point” of this storyline was to heal the rifts between the three Avengers and bring them into the “Age of Heroes” with a united front this issue does what it sets out to do. Though light in action it does set the table nicely for the final chapter. B+
Review by Spaceman Spiff

Justice League: Generation Lost #13: Wow. This issue took a couple turns I did not expect. Magog’s hot on the heels of Captain Atom after Max Lord orders the Captain’s execution, but is it really Atom’s demise Lord wants? This issue holds some major plot twists and a pretty big revelation for the whole Brightest Day storyline; it also features some nice team dynamics between Booster Gold and the new Blue Beetle, who I’m really enjoying in this book. A-
Review by Rebel Rikki

The New Avengers #6: “One Of These Avengers Will Die!” Yup, the cover doesn’t lie. And if you think about it and take a good look at the six Avengers on the cover you’ll figure out who it is. And now that I think about it, were they ever really and Avengers? Ah well… a fine wrap-up to the initial storyline that finds the new Avengers Mansion meeting a fate that’s befallen so many of Xavier’s Schools for Gifted Youngsters. A-
Review by Spaceman Spiff

Unwritten #19: Time and again Mike Carey and Peter Gross’ Unwritten cements itself as one of my favorite monthly books. Its commentary on the relationship between reality and fiction is spellbinding, and I love its use of a Harry Potter proxy to explore the potential of modern fiction. This particular issue features our hero Tom Taylor as he investigates his dad’s strange fascination with Herman Melville, while the villainous Mr. Pullman recruits some help to his shadow organization’s cause. It’s an excellent read all around, with some great plot and character developments and a very interesting last-page twist.  A-
Review by Rebel Rikki

The Thanos Imperative #6: Well, yeah, this is how you wrap up a major crossover. Abnett and Lanning set out to shake up the cosmic corner of the Marvel Universe and they do that here in spades. I’ve been reading this while the fantastic Guardians of the Galaxy—as well as the other cosmic books—were on hold for this series, but now I’m wondering if there is any way Guardians can come back. Very impressive, even if artist Miguel Sepulveda can’t quite seem to nail down Rocket Raccoon’s appearance. A
Review by Spaceman Spiff

Transformers #13: When it comes to comics that star giant robots, art ends up being a larger part of the equation than usual, I think. That’s unfortunate for this issue of Transformers, because its interiors (by fill-in artist Nick Roche) don’t stack up to the usual work that the book displays every month. It’s not all bad, but Nick’s got a really strange take on Hot Rod, who happens to star in this issue. Overall his art is far too cartoony, even goofy, and I don’t know that it has a place in the universe IDW’s set up for this book. The story by Mike Costa is great as usual, but it’s tough to see through the pencils to enjoy it.  C+
Review by Rebel Rikki

tags: avengers, justice league, knight & squire, new avengers, spider-man, thanos imperative, transformers, unwritten

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