Quick Hits: Reviews of Scarlet #3 and more…

Scarlet #3

Scarlet #3: This is probably the best drawn comic book on the stands right now. Alex Maleev simply has outdone himself with this series. Some people may bitch and moan that he uses real-life models to base his drawings on, but who cares. Results are results, and these results are fantastic. Issue #3 finds our heroine continuing her one-woman crusade against a crooked society, namely the Portland police force. After reading the second issue I thought for sure there would be no going back for this character, but her actions in this issue are even more likely to make enemies and bring the heat down on her. I’m not sure how long Bendis and Maleev plan on keeping this series around, but I’m hoping that it’s for quite a while. A-
Review by Spaceman Spiff

Brightest Day #13: The spotlight wheel sets its sights on the Hawks this issue, as all but two of this book’s pages are devoted to a massive battle scene between Hawkman and Hath-Set’s evil army. Actually, the battle scene is pretty cool and has some great art from Adrian Syaf, Ivan Reis and Joe Prado. The dialog unfortunately shows off Johns’ tendency (which I’ve mentioned before) to over-dramatize everything, thus taking any potential emotional impact out of any lines; additionally, the mid-issue flashback is kind of annoying. However, the last two pages are really interesting (and well-timed!) and have me anxiously awaiting Brightest Day #14.  B
Review by Rebel Rikki

I, Zombie #7: I, Zombie has an incredible talent for balancing so much in each issue: advancing the plot, building its own universe and eliciting character development and humor out of almost every page for starters. There’s a lot going on in this issue: our title character can’t find any brains to eat after a grave-robber keeps digging up her cemetery, her ghost friend Ellie learns a new thing or two about her abilities, a pair of monster hunters gets trapped by a vampire coven, and more. It’s an exciting read, beautifully drawn by Mike Allred, and one of the best books its genre has seen for years.  A
Review by Rebel Rikki

Strange Tales II #2: Marvel’s indie anthology series continues in fine fashion with a mix of great, often hilarious, stories by underground creators. Jamie Hernandez tells the tale of a superheroine stalker; Sheldon Vella riffs on Heavy Metal with a Ghost Rider tale; Paul Maybury shows us how Peter Parker barely manages to explain all of Spider-Man’s injuries. I especially loved the inclusion of an Uncanny X-Men story by Jeffrey Brown, possibly my favorite indie cartoonist. The only two real misses here come, strangely enough, from Tony Millionaire (whose Thor story can only be described as “bizarre”) and Gilbert Hernandez, who turns in an Iron Man story that left me scratching my head.  A-
Review by Rebel Rikki

Wolverine #3: Often times when you read a solicitation for an upcoming issue or storyline you find the actual issue to shoot a complete 180 degrees from what you pictured in your mind, other times the execution is just a little too close to home to what you imagined. I’m afraid that’s turning out to be the case for the “Logan Goes to Hell” arc running through this newest Wolverine series. Granted, there have been a few suprises… mainly the body count back in the land of the living and the appearance of Puck in hell below, but these haven’t really been enough to get my pulse racing. With two issues left to go with this story I’m hoping Jason Aaron will pull a few rabbits out of his hat. B-
Review by Spaceman Spiff

tags: brian michael bendis, brightest day, i, scarlet, Strange Tales, wolverine, zombie

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