Quick Hits: Thanos Imperative – Devastation and more…

Thanos Imperative - Devastation

The Thanos Imperative – Devastation: A fitting capstone to both The Thanos Imperative as well as The Guardians of the Galaxy. Longtime architects of the cosmic corner of the Marvel Universe, Abnett and Lanning both close one chapter and lay the groundwork for what’s to come in this one-shot. This issue finds Blastarr waging war against the weakened Kree and the Inhumans and we get flashbacks focusing on Cosmo, everyone’s favorite psychic and telekinetic Cosmonaut dog, assembling a new team based on Star Lord’s dying wishes. Whereas the Guardians of the Galaxy were a scrappy and ragtag team the new team Cosmo puts together, the Annihilators, is made up of some heavy hitters… whether this team will be as fun to read as the Guardians remains to be seen, but they’re certainly off to a good start. My biggest complaint? No Rocket Raccoon! B+
Review by Spaceman Spiff

Avengers – The Childrens Crusade #4: This mini-series is certainly amongst the prettiest comic book on the shelves. I can never say enough about Jim Cheung’s artwork. The story picks up a little steam from the last issue. What’s that? A softer side to Dr. Doom?? Well, maybe not… there’s certainly a twist in the impending nuptials between Doom and Wanda Maximoff. The one major red flag I have for this series is the characterization of Wolverine. I don’t think we’ve seen him this bloodthirsty—and for the blood of a former ally as well—in quite some time. Allan Heinberg lays out his reasoning for this in the issue, but it just doesn’t quite ring true for me just yet. Still, the last page sets things up very interestingly for the next issue… I’m certainly excited. A-
Review by Spaceman Spiff

Avengers Prime #5: Now that this story has wrapped up I find I have even less to say about it than before. I guess there just wasn’t much suspense as we all new our three heroes would win the battle against Hela and make their way back to Earth in the meantime mending their past differences with each other. I mean, we’ve already seen this in the other Avengers series that take place after this arc. But ah well, I suspect the main motivation of this series was for Allan Davis to have fun drawing three of Marvel’s heaviest hitters… and in that sense, mission accomplished. B
Review by Spaceman Spiff

Brightest Day #17: In my review of Brightest Day #16 I mentioned this series’ constant pacing problems, especially in the way it drops certain characters’ plotlines completely for months on end. #17 proves my point by returning the Hawks to the spotlight after a two-month hiatus (that’s 17% of the book’s entire run)… I didn’t even remember the Hawks were a part of this story! However, the pacing within #17 is actually a step up, as it manages to advance three or four plots in the span of one issue. In addition to showing us what Hawkman and Hawkgirl are up to, it gives us Deadman reconnecting with his only living relative, as well as a curious fate for Firestorm. It also has an especially cool cliffhanger, which this series has excelled at. However, there’s another major issue with this book: we have nine issues left in the series, only a third of its run, and little to no headway has been yet made in answering the question “why,” as in “why am I reading this?” That’s something I couldn’t stop asking throughout this issue.  C-
Review by Rebel Rikki

iZombie #9: Chris Roberson and Mike Allred’s monstrous Vertigo jem continues to shine in this month’s installment, in which brain-eater Gwen and monster-hunter Horatio go on a first date. Roberson is incredibly adept at juggling a slew of established characters while building up newer ones (this issue gives us more on our new antagonist, Professor Galatea). That’s a skill that should fill Superman fans with hope for his impending run. Meanwhile, Mike Allred continues to prove he deserves all the acclaim he’s ever gotten; this issue brings out his artistic talents in, of all things, spreads of a miniature golf course. Of course his wife, colorist Laura Allred, also makes major contributions to this book looking as great as it does. All-in-all, a consistently great title every month.  A-
Review by Rebel Rikki

Superboy #3: Jeff Lemire and Pier Gallo have given us probably the best issue of Superboy yet here. This time there’s no random guest appearance by an established DC supervillian; instead, Lemire focuses on Connor Kent and the high school world around him. That’s an especially rich vein to explore given that it’s basically been ignored for years. I believe Lemire has big plans for Connor’s supporting cast, especially because we’re now up to two classmates of Connor’s who’ve learned his secret identity rather casually. Besides that, this issue employs a nifty time-jumping angle and oh-so-subtly hearkens back to some of the magical silver age science-fiction/adventure comics that the character of Superboy first called home. I’m still not totally sold on Gallo’s artwork, but I think I’m adjusting; his lighter tone especially fits the non-action scenes that make this issue so great.  B+
Review by Rebel Rikki

Sweet Tooth #17: It’s really jarring to jump from reading Superboy to Sweet Tooth. Though both are written by the always-impressive Jeff Lemire, tonally the books could not be any different. Sweet Tooth is a horrific book, and I say that in the most loving way possible. Lemire’s brutal pencils perfectly match the bleak tone of this apocalyptic future. In this issue, Jeppard and his friends complete their liberation of the hybrid testing camp, with some disastrous results. The end of this issue is truly heartbreaking, possibly the most moving moment yet in the series. Sweet Tooth, along with iZombie and Unwritten, are probably the strongest titles Vertigo’s had in years; how lucky we are that they’re all currently being published.  A-
Review by Rebel Rikki

Transformers #15: Mike Costa and Don Figueroa continue their examination of what might happen if giant robots chose Earth as a battleground in the real world. In this issue, a militant group of xenophobic protestors has gotten their hands on powerful weaponry that happens to be assembled from the discarded body of Megatron. Meanwhile, Megatron helpfully (and creepily) narrates how he got a new body, and Ultra Magnus tries to take command of whatever humans and Autobots are left unscathed after a botched international incident. This is dense storytelling that somehow manages to incorporate threads of politics, classism, psychological warfare and character development of giant robots from outer space. Even in Michael Bay’s dream world, his movies are not this good.  A
Review by Rebel Rikki

tags: avengers, brightest day, guardians of the galaxy, izombie, superboy, sweet tooth, thanos, transformers

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