Quick Hits: Reviews of Unwritten #20 and more…

Unwritten #20

Unwritten #20: Easily one of the strongest monthly titles on the stands right now, Mike Carey and Peter Gross’ Unwritten continues in fine form as Tom Taylor pursues his whale — literally! Tom’s on the hunt for Moby Dick, whose story will help him unlock the mystery of everything happening to him, but his mysterious enemies in the Cabal have other plans. I love the way this book balances classic literature and metaphysical philosophy with great character development; I’m totally hooked by the new dynamic introduced between Tom and his companion Lizzie. Also, I can’t believe I have gone this long without mentioning the amazing cover work of Yuko Shimizu, whose alluring portraits always provide compelling inroads to this fantastic tale.  A-
Review by Rebel Rikki

The Amazing Spider-Man #650: I’m loving this new direction on Spider-Man from writer Dan Slott. So much so that I’m not even hating Humberto Ramos’ art as much as I usually do. This issue finds Spidey facing off against the new Hobgoblin along with some help from Peter Parker’s new coworkers, as well as the debut of a new spider-suit that should come very much into play next issue when this arc wraps up. All that and the Black Cat! A
Review by Spaceman Spiff

Batman & Robin #18: I’m really conflicted about this three-issue arc. On the one hand, I love me some Paul Cornell. On the other hand, Scott McDaniel is a terrible artist. On a third hand, although the actual writing of Batman and Robin is sharp, far too much of this issue (roughly half) is spent in flashback for my taste, as it details the bizarre origin story of new villain The Absence. If you’ll grant me a fourth hand, this is the least offensive McDaniel artwork I’ve ever seen, and that’s probably helped by his artistic collaborator Christopher Jones. My point: there’s both good and bad to the first Batman & Robin arc post-Morrison, but despite some nifty writing I feel it’s mostly disposable (although it did get me to look up Dandy-Walker Syndrome, which is nice). B-
Review by Rebel Rikki

Darkwing Duck #7: Is it weird to criticize what’s essentially marketed as a children’s comic? Perhaps, but Darkwing Duck has been stunningly good so far, providing a nice bit of nostalgia for people who fondly remember the original cartoon series (like myself) while supplying enough action and humor to hook modern comics fans. This issue, the third part of the reality-blending “Crisis on Infinite Darkwings,” is probably the weakest installment of the series so far. It’s hurt by some confusing action sequences, as well as a villain reveal that seemingly comes out of nowhere. However, it should be mentioned that writer Ian Brill is a genuinely funny guy. He throws in jokes that would be good in any context, and the fact that they’re presented in the world of Darkwing Duck makes this comic all the better.  B-
Review by Rebel Rikki

Green Lantern #60: In this issue, Parallax possesses Barry Allen and tries to beat the crap out of Hal. I can’t help but feel like we’ve seen this story about a dozen times before, including a couple times just in the past year of Green Lantern. It’s a tapped well, and very disappointing when one considers all the fascinating plot threads out there for Geoff Johns to explore. For instance, this issue gives us but one page of the Sinestro/Atrocitus detective team — I feel like that could carry an issue in itself. In the plus column, Doug Mahnke does a simply amazing job showing us all what a widescreen-style action comic can look like (notice the relative sparseness of narrow panels), and the last-page reveal is pretty awesome.  B
Review by Rebel Rikki

Strange Tales #3: Marvel’s second installment of their indie anthology series ends here, and not quite as strongly as it came in. While I love the concept of these books (so much so I wish it was monthly!) the execution sometimes leaves something to be desired. So it goes when you have something like 15 creators working on any given issue, I suppose, but I found a lot of this installment’s vignettes to be a little confusing — not especially funny or weirdly poignant, just odd. However, Michael Deforge turns in a hilarious Spider-Man/Iceman/Jubilee strip, and Alex Robinson (of the wonderful Too Cool to Be Forgotten) does some great work with a pre-Fantastic Four Reed Richards. The issue ends with a nice tribute to Harvey Pekar, including a four-page comic written by the man himself. It’s a fitting ending to a basically solid series.  B
Review by Rebel Rikki

Uncanny X-Force #3: As much as I loved the previous run of X-Force, Rick Remender is certainly wasting no time is establishing his mark on this title. Besides X-Factor—and really, it’s hard to compare the two—this is by far my favorite X-Book on the shelves. More glorious art from Opeña and Logan and the rest of the team regroup after fighting the Horsemen of Apocalypse. Next issue certainly looks to be a doozy! A-
Review by Spaceman Spiff

tags: batman & robin, darkwing duck, green lantern, spider-man, Strange Tales, unwritten, x-force

  • Latest Nothings
  • site design: haystack needle design    privacy policy©2011 nerdynothings.com     RSS