Rubber

rubber-1

on March 21, 2011

3 Comments

Is it possible to set out to make a smash cult hit and actually succeed? Your first instinct might be yes, as many of the biggest cult films today have similar aesthetics and sensibilities. But thinking through the films that have the smash cult followings (The Room, Birdemic: Shock and Terror, even Plan 9 from Outer Space), I find they are linked by the filmmakers’ desire (and often assurances) to make a “good” film. And while films which are obviously trying to piggy-back on these “successes” and try to create a cult phenomenon (Repo!, The Genetic Opera, etc) may achieve a small cult following, they often pale in comparison to the films that sell out midnight shows all across the country on a consistent basis. — more

Tagged: Quentin Dupieux, rubber
Found in Movie Reviews

Paul

paul-1

on March 21, 2011

2 Comments

If you’re a regular reader of this blog, then go see Paul and I pretty much guarantee you will, if not love it, enjoy yourself immensely. In fact, it was seemingly made for you, the comic-loving, film-swilling, sci-fi tv amorist, i.e. a nerd. — more

Tagged: greg mottala, nick frost, paul, seth rogen, simon pegg
Found in Movie Reviews

Battle: Los Angeles

battle-1

on March 14, 2011

No Comments

I am sure it seemed like a “can’t miss” idea — combining Blackhawk Down with Independence Day, it’ll be the ultimate war/adventure movie/spectacle. If I was in the room at the time, I probably would have agreed with it as a concept. But in practice, sadly, it doesn’t work. Not even a little bit. — more

Tagged: aaron eckhart, battle: los angeles, Jonathan Liebesman, michael pena, michelle rodriguez
Found in Movie Reviews

Rango

rango-1

on March 14, 2011

No Comments

We are in an age where animated films are able to be both financially and critically successful. Five of the top ten grossing films of 2010 were animated, and outside of Shrek Forever After, they all received generally great reviews. In the world of Pixar, animated films are held to a higher standard, and other animation studios are starting to catch up — Dreamworks’ How to Train Your Dragon and the new presence of Illumination Entertainment (Despicable Me) show that this is the new golden age of American animation. No longer can a critic judge an animated film as a film only for children. — more

Tagged: gore verbinski, isla fisher, johnny depp, rango
Found in Movie Reviews

Jane Eyre

jane-eyre-1

on March 11, 2011

No Comments

Over the past few years we’ve seen a handful of classic British novels re-imagined for a younger audience with the requisite amount of sex and gore. From the work of Seth Grahame-Smith (Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters) to the upcoming Catherine Hardwicke Twilight-inspired Red Riding Hood, geek culture is told that these old classics are an awful lot cooler when exchanging the lovey-dovey romance for unadulterated sex and thrills. — more

Tagged: jamie bell, jane eyre, judi dench, Mia Wasikowska, sally hawkins
Found in Movie Reviews

Win Win

winwin-1

on March 09, 2011

2 Comments

There are two kinds of people in the world: those who think Paul Giamatti is the filet mignon of actors and those who don’t know shit about talent. Joking, but I have been a fervent ‘Matti fan since he donned the blue track suit of Veal Chop in the criminally overlooked Safe Men. Is he one-note? Not at all. Don’t be influenced by the melancholy nature of the characters he portrays. This is, after all, the man who starred in Big Fat Liar and Thunderpants. Anyone whose career can survive back-to-back disasters of that magnitude can do anything he wants. — more

Tagged: amy ryan, paul giamatti, thomas mccarthy, win win
Found in Movie Reviews

Poetry

poetry-2

on March 07, 2011

No Comments

Lee Chang-dong’s Poetry resembles much of what is great about the current cinema coming out of South Korea — for my money, some of the best in the world. With recent films like Oldboy, The Host, Mother and The Good, the Bad, the Weird, South Koreans have proven time after time that genre film-making can be exciting, and unique to their culture and vision. Whenever I see a new South Korean film, I’m consistently shattered by the gorgeous cinematography and expert story-telling. The heightened emotion and indelible quirk is something we just don’t see in modern American films. — more

Tagged: Lee Chang-dong, poetry, Yun Jeong-hie
Found in Movie Reviews

Unknown

unknown-movie-liam-1

on March 02, 2011

3 Comments

There are two fundamental ways to look at spoilers in terms of movie reviews. Most reviewers, rightfully so, avoid spoilers and instead focus on skeletal plot structures to draw their criticisms. The other option, of course, is to dive right in and get down to the gritty machinations of each plot twist. For many films, even those which rely very heavily on plotting, it’s easy enough to stay vague while still giving appropriate and insightful viewpoints. Some, however, make the task very difficult. — more

Tagged: january jones, liam neeson, unknown
Found in Movie Reviews

Cedar Rapids

cedar-rapids-1

on February 10, 2011

2 Comments

John C. Reilly’s career, as seen from the perspective of a long-time fan, looks like the most boring roller coaster in the world. One long flat track punctuated by a towering hill at the end that never drops. I remember him first and fondly from his appearances in Paul Thomas Anderson’s 90s indies: Hard Eight (Sydney), Boogie Nights and Magnolia. He also made small but worthy appearances in What’s Eating Gilbert Grape, Hoffa and The Thin Red Line. He seemed destined to be a great character actor, someone who’d churn out indie after indie, but never quite break into the mainstream. But he did. He hit it out of the park, popularity-wise, with Talledega Nights and hasn’t looked back. — more

Tagged: anne heche, cedar rapids, ed helms, john c reilly, miguel arteta
Found in Movie Reviews

happythankyoumoreplease

happythankyou-1

on February 01, 2011

2 Comments

Ted Mosby and Josh Radnor are inextricably linked in my brain. I’ll call him Ted if I ever met him — he probably hates that. I imagine most actors who become immersed in long running TV shows, such as How I Met Your Mother, have tremendous difficulty shedding those alter egos. Radnor who wrote and then directed himself, as the protagonist, Sam in Happythankyoumoreplease has no one to blame but himself if he fails to distinguish himself suitably. Well, he lucked out, and does an amazing job. — more

Tagged: happythankyoumoreplease, josh radnor, malin akerman, tony hale
Found in Movie Reviews

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